Simone’s polished yet perverse romanticism

Purity with a pizzicato of perversity in a wickedly romantic fashion show by Simone Rocha, where veteran models added to the mood, helping to make this event a proper fashion moment.
 

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Simone Rocha - Fall-Winter 2019 - Womenswear - London - © PixelFormula

A blend of inspirations from uber femininity allied to the raw sculpture of Louise Bourgeois; and a great fashion statement.
 
Since her debut show in 2010, Rocha has created a highly identifiable style, expressing haute romanticism with a certain edgy poetry.
 
She cuts gowns and coats with exaggerated ruffles, dimples and darts, but they never managed to overpower the ensemble. Rocha favors deepest calico black, crushed velvet, bold blurred florals and antique-looking silks. They give her clothes a certain grandeur yet they never look old.
 
Staged deep inside the salons of the Royal Academy on Piccadilly, the cast marched through multiple rooms to a highly dramatic soundtrack. In some great "sound architecture," Frédéric Sanchez mixed up Meredith Hall & Jacob Heringman’s The "Willow Song" to Blou & Choeur Du Nouveau Monde’s "Samba à Maggy". To which Chloë Sevigny, Jenny Howarth, hipster Lindsey Wixson and a gang of veteran stars wafted by in semi-sheer tulle trenches worn over flesh-colored dresses. Rocha finished many with red crystal bras and straps and curvy trims; and sculpted many evening dresses with true elan.

The collection garnered huge applause from an audience that included socialite and British Fashion Council ambassador Laura Bailey to singer Paloma Faith to presenter Daisy Lowe. 
 
"Security and intimacy. I began by being playful in my head and then it got a little Peeping Tom," laughed Rocha in the crowded backstage.
 
Added into the mix, Michael Powell Technicolor 50s movies, which helped explain the scarlet ballet slippers and pumps, since he directed that ultimate melodrama The Red Shoes.


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Simone Rocha - Fall-Winter 2019 - Womenswear - London - © PixelFormula

Rocha even linked up with Louise Bourgeois's Easton Foundation, referencing the artist’s fabrics and print works by making new materials for her own collection – turning them into taffeta frocks.
 
A memorable show and collection, which played on transparency throughout, even as it experimented with wicked tailoring.

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